Home   ::  Login   ::  Register   ::  Post

:: Computers & Technology

negotiating a raise

sulaiman isse
Posted: 2014-04-18

So you want a raise? Why are you asking for one ĖDo you want it? Need It? Deserve it? In this climate it needs to be that you deserve it. Everyone is keeping an eye on costs and making sure they are getting value for money. If you get a raise, everyone else will want one, particularly if your discretion canít be relied on! Wait until you have a track record of accomplishments you can point to that show you merit the raise. Avoid asking for an increase if youíve only been on the job for a few months or if the company is struggling financially. You need to look at it from the company point of view. When someone asks for more money, a manager will consider that personís value. They will be more willing to accommodate someone fantastic who they donít want to loseóand less likely when the request comes from someone who performs just adequately. So you want a raise? Why are you asking for one ĖDo you want it? Need It? Deserve it? In this climate it needs to be that you deserve it. Everyone is keeping an eye on costs and making sure they are getting value for money. If you get a raise, everyone else will want one, particularly if your discretion canít be relied on! Wait until you have a track record of accomplishments you can point to that show you merit the raise. Avoid asking for an increase if youíve only been on the job for a few months or if the company is struggling financially. You need to look at it from the company point of view. When someone asks for more money, a manager will consider that personís value. They will be more willing to accommodate someone fantastic who they donít want to loseóand less likely when the request comes from someone who performs just adequately. Your request needs to be about your value to the company, not about your expenses. Employers donít pay people based on their financial needs. So present reasons that are about business and your proven value to the company. Itís often the case that someone who has been with the company for a while but is doing a worse job than you is getting more money, but managers will not respond well if you use a colleagueís salary as the basis for a raise request. Instead show them you have based your request on the industry standard and what youíll be bringing to the company, nothing else. Research your value, research the job and the company. There is a tremendous amount of information online as to what the market rate for particular positions is. Look at free salary comparisons, surveys and databases. Build a case for why youíve earned an increase, and why your company is better off because of your work. Think back to any special achievements in the last year or how youíve positively affected the business. Why would your company be worse off if you left? Think about your last review-what did your manager comment on that you had done well? You need to be confident you have earned an increase, not just because a yearís gone by, or because youíve completed the basic requirements of your job. In this economic climate they probably canít just put customerís prices up, so why should you be able to? Keep a note during the year of things you want to draw attention to at the right time. This is best practice in preparation for your annual review anyway. Maybe you can show a file of comments or complimentary emails youíve received from colleagues. Or maybe you can show that your idea increased revenue by X, or that your productivity rate is twice the average rate. Have you been asked to take on increased responsibilities? An annual review is a good time to bring up the subject of future prospects, chances of promotion, likely salary increases. In a good review process, your manager will bring this up. If not, it is a subject to bring up as the meeting draws to a close. As long as the review went well that is ! Donít threaten to leave, at least until you have a better offer! Even if itís true, you donít need to say it. Managers understand that this is the implication when someone asks for an increase. Plan your pitch! You might say ďThe Company has been great about rewarding my performance with increased responsibilities, and I appreciate that. Iíve been outperforming my targets for a while now and Iíd like to talk about adjusting my salary to reflect thatĒ. If your manager says no, then ask what you would need to achieve to earn an increase in the future. Ask them to be specific. What targets would you need to hit? How else can you contribute? If you do hit them would an increase be guaranteed? At the very least you can refer to those benchmarks the next time you ask for an increase. Your request needs to be about your value to the company, not about your expenses. Employers donít pay people based on their financial needs. So present reasons that are about business and your proven value to the company. Itís often the case that someone who has been with the company for a while but is doing a worse job than you is getting more money, but managers will not respond well if you use a colleagueís salary as the basis for a raise request. Instead show them you have based your request on the industry standard and what youíll be bringing to the company, nothing else. Research your value, research the job and the company. There is a tremendous amount of information online as to what the market rate for particular positions is. Look at free salary comparisons, surveys and databases. Build a case for why youíve earned an increase, and why your company is better off because of your work. Think back to any special achievements in the last year or how youíve positively affected the business. Why would your company be worse off if you left? Think about your last review-what did your manager comment on that you had done well? Keep a note during the year of things you want to draw attention to at the right time. This is best practice in preparation for your annual review anyway. Maybe you can show a file of comments or complimentary emails youíve received from colleagues. Or maybe you can show that your idea increased revenue by X, or that your productivity rate is twice the average rate. Have you been asked to take on increased responsibilities? An annual review is a good time to bring up the subject of future prospects, chances of promotion, likely salary increases. In a good review process, your manager will bring this up. If not, it is a subject to bring up as the meeting draws to a close. As long as the review went well that is ! Donít threaten to leave, at least until you have a better offer! Even if itís true, you donít need to say it. Managers understand that this is the implication when someone asks for an increase. Plan your pitch! You might say ďThe Company has been great about rewarding my performance with increased responsibilities, and I appreciate that. Iíve been outperforming my targets for a while now and Iíd like to talk about adjusting my salary to reflect thatĒ. If your manager says no, then ask what you would need to achieve to earn an increase in the future. Ask them to be specific. What targets would you need to hit? How else can you contribute? If you do hit them would an increase be guaranteed? At the very least you can refer to those benchmarks the next time you ask for an increase.

© Copyright 2019-2020 SpiderTip.Com